What is Disenfranchised Grief?

By: Allyson England Drake, M.Ed, CT Kenneth Doka created the term disenfranchised grief as “a loss that is not or cannot be openly acknowledged, socially sanctioned, or publicly mourned.” It is known as “hidden grief or sorrow.” Many times, those who are grieving a loss that is termed disenfranchised, they feel like they cannot openly…

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2022 Live Your Dash Luncheon

Full Circle is proud to present our 8th annual Live Your Dash Luncheon Friday, April 29, 2022. The luncheon is themed after the poem titled “The Dash” by Linda Ellis and awards a select few in the Richmond area who are truly making a meaningful difference in our community.  These award winners are selfless, hard-working, dedicated…

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Loss of My Child

By: Tiffany Spede, Guest Blogger “You mean my baby is dead?”“I’m telling you her heart isn’t strong enough on its own, so we are having to help her.” And so began the 45 minutes of praying and pleading and begging and bargaining with God that occurs when hospital staff is performing CPR on your precious…

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Grounding Techniques to Support Grieving Children

By Rachel Melhorn, LCSW, Registered Play Therapist Here at Full Circle, we talk a lot about “big feelings.” When we use this term, we are referring to grieving children’s struggles with emotional regulation. This may look like an extended tantrum, uncontrollable crying, fit of anger, or bout of anxiety. Grounding techniques are mindfulness strategies that…

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Mindful Movement to Support Grieving Children

By Rachel Melhorn, LCSW, Registered Play Therapist For many children, movement (bouncing, running, fidgeting, skipping) is a natural state of being. Many times, when we ask kids to “pay attention,” what we are really saying is “stop moving,” but physical movement has such a positive impact on the emotional well-being of children. Mindful movement is…

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Loss in Later Life

By Wendy Boggs, MS-G, Counseling Intern To play on a common turn of phrase, when you’ve seen one older adult, you’ve seen ONE older adult. This is important to remember when considering America’s elders, as the older adult population is also the most heterogeneous. So, what’s this mean?  It means we have to work to remember older people…

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